Title:

Structuring that which cannot be structured: A role for formal models in representing aspects of Medieval Scotland

Year:

2013

Abstract:

Computing offers a bit of a paradox when it comes to historical studies. On one hand, one suspects that almost all academic historians in at least Western Europe and North America have a computer both in their office and at home and use it daily for email, word processing and for surfing the World Wide Web. However, in spite of their daily contact with the machine, they view it as having little or nothing to do with the essence of their research. Now, the fact that historians use the computer every day as a part of their research activities, but both hardly notice it and probably don’t often think that it actually affects what they do, turns out to be an interesting phenomenon that is, of course, not restricted to the doing of history. Indeed, the ability of tools such as word processing, email and the WWW to fit into the normal way of doing things so that they are almost invisible, shows an aspect to computing that is significant in its own right. However, this paper presents an example of a more prominent role for the computer in the doing of history. We focus on one of the ways in which computing obviously significantly impacts on the research: representing the product of historical research as highly structured materials in databases, and use the Paradox of Medieval Scotland (PoMS 2010) project as the prime example.

Full reference:

John Bradley, Michele Pasin. Structuring that which cannot be structured: A role for formal models in representing aspects of Medieval Scotland - New Perspectives on Medieval Scotland: 1093-1286 Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, Studies in Celtic History Series August 2013 .



Linkout:


See also:

2013


Oct 2013

Moving EMLoT towards the web of data: an approach to the representation of humanities citations based on role theory and formal ontology.
Michele Pasin, Riichiro Mizoguchi

New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, (forthcoming). (part of the 'Envisioning REED in the Digital Age' collection)



Aug 2013

Structuring that which cannot be structured: A role for formal models in representing aspects of Medieval Scotland.
John Bradley, Michele Pasin

New Perspectives on Medieval Scotland: 1093-1286, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, Studies in Celtic History Series, Aug 2013.


2012


Jul 2012

Annotation and Ontology in most Humanities research: accommodating a more informal interpretation context.
John Bradley, Michele Pasin

NeDiMaH workshop on ontology based annotation, held in conjunction with Digital Humanities 2012, Hamburg, Germany, Jul 2012.


2011


Sep 2011

Prosopography and Computer Ontologies: towards a formal representation of the ‘factoid’ model by means of CIDOC-CRM.
John Bradley, Michele Pasin

Representing Knowledge in the Digital Humanities, Lawrence, Kansas, Sep 2011.


2010


Aug 2010

Semantic Technologies for ELearning: A case study in the philosophical domain: representing Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.
Michele Pasin, Enrico Motta, Zdenek Zdrahal

LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, Aug 2010.


2008


Jun 2008

Formalizing ʻphilosophicalʼ narratives: the tension between form and content.
Michele Pasin, Simon Buckingham-Shum, Enrico Motta

European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP08), Montpellier, France, Jun 2008.